Blog

Aug 21 2015

Weekend Lunch Idea – Quinoa tabbouleh


Weekend Lunch Idea – Quinoa tabbouleh

Weekend Lunch Idea – Quinoa tabbouleh Ingredients : 100g dried quinoa, 75g parsley, roughly chopped, 300g tomatoes, cut into 1cm dice (no need to remove the seeds), 100g cucumber, cut into small dice Dressing: 1 tbsp olive oil,   2 tbsp balsamic vinegar,   juice and zest 1/2 lemon,   drop of vanilla extract, 1 tsp rice syrup or agave,  pinch of Himalayan pink salt,  1 garlic clove crushed, 50g salad leaves. Method: Cook the quinoa following pack instructions, then set aside to cool.  Make the dressing by adding the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, vanilla extract, rice syrup, pinch of salt and garlic into a jug and whisk until smooth. Mix this into the quinoa and mix together with all the other ingredients. Serve on a bed of salad leaves. Enjoy!  

Read more

Aug 14 2015

Weekend Workout


Weekend Workout

    WEEKEND WORKOUT SATURDAY AND SUNDAY ENJOY!!

Read more

Jun 19 2015

Killer Leg and Butt Workout


Killer Leg and Butt Workout

Killer ‘Legs’ and ‘Butt’ workout. 20 – Barbell Squats 15 – Barbell Dead-Lifts 20 – Barbell Forward Lunges 20 – Jumping Squat 20 – 2 Footed Bench Jumps 30 – Jumping Lunges (Repeat 5 Times) ENJOY!

Read more

Mar 06 2015

Autumn Fitness Training Tips


Autumn Fitness Training Tips

Autumn Fitness Training Tips:- Autumn is a transitional time of year. The leaves on the trees change, it becomes darker earlier, and the temperatures cool down. It is a favorite time of year for many people. However, these same changes can also lead to stress for individuals who tend to fall off the health and fitness wagon during the transition. There are many enjoyable opportunities to remain fit, or even begin a fitness program in Autumn that can work for everyone. Planning for seasonal changes, finding support from group exercise and embracing events and activities that the season has to offer are key factors in staying fit through the transition. Here are a few examples to help you stay fit and healthy this Autumn 1) Dress for the change in temperature. Longer leggings and long sleeve tops or jackets 2) Stay ‘Hydrated’ even know though it is cooler in temperature. Drink water. 3) Train in the morning and get your training done nice and early. When you finish work and see that it is getting dark outside, it can give you a great excuse not to train. No Excuses! 4) Get a buddy so you can help motivate one another 5) Buy a DISCOUNTED outdoor group training pack. Having paid for the sessions in advance should be good motivation to get to the sessions.

Read more

Jan 03 2015

MUFFINS MADE EASY


MUFFINS MADE EASY

MUFFINS MADE EASY! What you’ll need 1 cup of almond flour or almond meal (or substitute, coconut flour) 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon of maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar Go plain or add in your favourite healthy extras such as apple and cinnamon. Cook (or microwave) your apple until soft before popping it into your muffin mix for extra melt-in-your-mouth factor… or ditch the apple and add dark chocolate or berries instead! What you’ll do Preheat your oven to 180° Combine almond flour/meal and baking soda together in a bowl In a separate bowl, combine eggs, syrup / honey and vinegar Stir dry ingredients into wet, mixing until combined (+ add any ‘extras’) Scoop batter into paper muffin cups, or a lined tin Bake (still at 180°) for 30 minutes, until slightly browned around the edges Allow to cool in the pan before serving with a little bit of organic butter! ENJOY!

Read more

Dec 28 2014

Positive Thinking, Energy and Happiness


Positive Thinking, Energy and Happiness

I hope 2015 brings you:- Positive Thinking Energy Initiative Happiness Be kind to yourself, love yourself and respect yourself

Read more

Dec 13 2014

How to boost your performance and maximise your results


How to boost your performance and maximise your results

How to boost your performance and maximise your results by Nardia Norman (Fitness Network’s PT of the year 2014). Tips on enhancing your performance whilst training. It’s a good idea to ensure your basic health is good before embarking on a training regime as well as ensuring it’s looked after throughout –whether that be a new Personal Training regime or training for a particular event e.g. a long distance run. Some may say, “Well, I’m starting PT because I wanna get fit!” – TRUE, but there’s still a few things that would be helpful to address in the early stages which will also enhance your progress rather than hinder it. I was thinking about what I would want a client to do and check prior to training them, if I were their Personal Trainer – so, the following are just a few things worth checking in the bloods as well as factors to address during your training. This is not a comprehensive article relating to sports nutrition  – but just some helpful tips that certainly helped me during the marathon training  as well as factors commonly  addressed when seeing patients in the clinical setting. All within the realms of a little blog post- some lifestyle/nutrition factors and some recommended blood tests. Lifestyle/Nutrition factors CLEAN UP THE JUNK! First and foremost, a clean diet is a huge part of your exercise regime. As they say, “abs are made in the kitchen not the gym!”. Of course, your sweat and tears will help as you aim to sculpt that core, but nutrition is at least two thirds of the story.  I won’t repeat the usual stuff you have heard…OK- just very briefly in case you need a reminder! – lots of veggies (ensure anti-oxidant rich berries), some fruit, cut down on gluten/processed foods (gluten especially wheat damages the gut lining in virtually everyone- regardless of whether or not you have gluten intolerance or have coeliac disease), protein at every meal, good fats (absolutely essential for our cell membranes and functioning; caution with “low fat” diets- the other stuff put in there could be relatively crap processed carbs) , adequate hydration and finally – reduce or stop alcohol! STRESS High cortisol levels will contribute towards muscle  loss and fat gain – hence counteract the effort. Although we can’t escape our daily work lives, ensure adequate stress management techniques- whether that be going for short walks, some stretching, meditation- little things that can be incorporated at work as well as scheduling things after work or weekends. SLEEP We need sleep for our rest and restoration. Simple. The critical hours are between 10pm and 2am. Humans spend a third of their lives asleep- it must be important! Various hormones critical here including growth hormone (helps repair after exercise), DHEA and melatonin (anti oxidant and anti aging). ANTIOXIDANTS  Apart from eating from a rainbow- i.e a variety of different fruits and veg, consider taking extra vitamin C  or other antioxidant supplements like NAC (N-acetyl cysteine, a precursor for glutathione- one of our most important endogenous antioxidants). This of course also depends on the level of activity and training. ALKALISE  Exercise is a stress to the body, where free radicals (oxidative stress)  and lactic acid is produced. So ensuring you get a good intake of fruit/veg esp green ones is important. You could consider a green antioxidant powder. MAGNESIUM / B Vitamins  Most of us are probably deficient in magnesium- it is necessary for over 300 biochemical reactions. Consider taking when training and especially if doing endurance/long distance training like running. Common symptoms of magnesium deficiency include tiredness, muscle spasms/cramps, anxiety, irregular heart rhythm, eye twitching, headaches and insomnia. PROTEIN Important for any type of training –not just for building muscles. We all need around 1g/kg of body weight worth of protein – apart from the obvious like muscle growth and repair, we also need protein to make all our hormones including thyroid hormones which are critical in our metabolism. Although best to get from protein rich sources, vegetarians may also need to consider a good quality protein supplement. WATER Obvious but still easy to overlook! Ensure adequate hydration especially between meals. Although 2 litres is usually given as the standard intake, this can certainly vary amongst individuals- an easy way to see if you are getting enough water is that the colour of the urine should be almost clear. Blood tests 1.FULL BLOOD COUNT(FBC) AND IRON –  The FBC shows if you have anaemia (low haemoglobin) which can contribute towards symptoms like tiredness, breathlessness, dizziness, poor immunity  and poor recovery from training. However, this may be  normal but the iron levels could still be suboptimal. Iron is not only needed in relation to carrying oxygen around in the blood (part of haemoglobin), it is also in the myoglobin of muscles, is needed to convert glucose to energy and important in liver detoxification and thyroid health as well as the production of neurotranmitters and hormones.  Iron can be low due to poor dietary intake, especially if vegetarian/vegan but can also be lost through the gut if there is “leaky gut” – hence the importance of gut health and diet!  Replacement can be via oral liquid/tablets but injections and creams are also available. Note that vitamin C is required for iron absorption. 2.THYROID TESTS – This could be a whole chapter! – will keep it brief here. Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)  is much more common than overactive. Common symptoms include tiredness, weight gain, difficulty losing weight, cold extremities, cold intolerance, palpitations, dry skin, dry hair and hair loss, low mood, heavy periods and chronic constipation. Standard testing only allows for a test called TSH (which least corresponds to thyroid functioning) – even if it is in “normal” limits, there could still be a thyroid issue and further tests are needed- this includes both medicare and non- medicare functional tests . So if you have been told your “tests are normal” , this may well  need to be looked into further.  Other clues that the thyroid may be underactive is high cholesterol. Underactive thyroid is also associated with adrenal fatigue (stress related), oestrogen excess and insulin resistance. Unfortunately, so many people are underdiagnosed and continue to suffer symptoms because their tests are  “normal”. Or they may be treated for depression (anti – depressants), high cholesterol ( statin), heavy periods (painkillers or the contraceptive pill) – and various other drugs to treat the other symptoms-  a complete misdiagnosis and failing on the part of the medical profession! It doesn’t necessarily have to be like this! Please ensure you get tested properly if you have concerns. 3.VITAMIN D  – there are vitamin D receptors in every cell of the body; the role of vitamin D is crucial. It has roles in not just calcium metabolism, but also thyroid function, cardiovascular function, weight management, diabetes, gut health and cancer protection.  Despite the ozzie sun, people can still be low in it- inadequate exposure or just not getting converted properly to its active forms via the kidney and liver. Once again, normal levels are not necessarily optimal. Aim for 100-150 in the blood tests (as per Vitamin D council recommendations.) 4. B VITAMINS –B12, FOLATE – these are the two B vitamins that commonly get measured. Low B12 can cause various symptoms including tiredness, weakness, dizziness, sore tongue, tingling/numbness of extremities, confusion –  and can also be associated with other disorders like pernicious anaemia and gut disorders where the vitamin cannot be absorbed. Again, it can also be low in vegetarians/vegans.  Folic acid (vitamin B9) is absolutely critical for every cell. It is used to convert carbs/proteins/fats into energy/ATP (Krebs cycle), make red blood cells, protect DNA,  neurotransmitter  and hormone production (serotonin, dopamine, melatonin) and it has a role  in the recycling of homocysteine- a known independent risk factor for conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, migraines, recurrent miscarriages, infertility and Alzheimers disease. Abnormal B12/Folate results can also imply problems with a process called methylation, an important biochemical process in the body. Both vitamins need to be converted to their active forms by our genes/enzymes- if there are genetic defects, we cannot do this and hence we have a functional vitamin deficiency- in such a scenario, it would be necessary to have active B vitamins to bypass this roadblock –normal B vitamins may not suffice. 5. GLUCOSE / INSULIN LEVELS – In non -diabetics, a borderline glucose  can  indicate insulin resistance. In those with early insulin resistance, the insulin level could be raised before the glucose has become abnormal -this is relevant as action can be taken so this doesn’t develop further into diabetes. Apart from diet,  certainly the nature of the training program  will be important- and will be a good parameter to monitor. When there is insulin resistance there is rationale for resistance/weights training , as opposed to just cardio. For women, it may also be associated with polcystic ovaries, oestrogen excess as well as thyroid and adrenal issues- they all affect each other and it is important to address all of these appropriately. The basic blood  tests can be ordered by any health care practitioner.  Further testing (e.g thyroid, adrenal hormones, nutrients )  may need to be ordered  via an appropriate health practitioner. So… just a few things to think about as you embark on training for an event or if you are already training – optimise your fitness and health and enjoy the challenge!

Read more

Dec 03 2014

Healthy Ball Snacks


Healthy Ball Snacks

  330 g raw whole almonds or walnuts 20 fresh dates, pitted 3 generous tablespoons cacao powder 1 teaspoon natural vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon ground  cinnamon 1 orange coconut, goji berry, cacao, nuts for rolling Throw almonds into the food processor with cinnamon, a little orange zest then process until the mix looks crumbly. Add dates, vanilla extract then process again until the mix starts to come together. Add a splash of water if you need to so that mixture is soft and forms a soft ball. Form into 14 decent sized balls. Roll in coconut or any other  of my suggested coatings and store in the fridge until you feel like a snack or quick meal on the run. Store in the fridge for up to 4 weeks if they last that long. ENJOY!!

Read more

Nov 21 2014

Green Renewal Juice


Green Renewal Juice

Green Renewal Juice This is an enzyme-rich green juice. It’s great for providing energy, detoxifying and alkalising your body It’s quick and easy to make.     Ingredients:- 1 bunch English spinach 1 handful mint 1 handful parsley 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 Lebanese (short) cucumber, cut in half lengthways A few lettuce leaves 4 celery stalks 2–3 cm (3/4–11/4 inch) knob of fresh ginger, peeled 6 ice cubes Preparation:- Feed all the ingredients except the ice cubes into a juicer one at a time. Pour into a drinking glass, add the ice cubes and sip slowly to enjoy its benefits.  ENJOY!

Read more

Nov 15 2014

Blueberry goodness for breakfast.


Blueberry goodness for breakfast.

Blueberries Fresh or frozen, these tiny superfruits pack a big antioxidant punch. Or better yet, a flurry of punches: Studies suggest that eating blueberries regularly can help improve everything from memory and motor skills to blood pressure and metabolism. (Wild blueberries, in particular, have one of the highest concentrations of the powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins.) Blueberries are also lower in calories than a lot of other fruits (they contain just 80 per cup), so you can pile them onto your breakfast without worrying about your waistline.

Read more